Project Spotlight

Brookfield Residential and HomeAid San Diego Named AFP Outstanding Philanthropic Cormporation

Homebuilding Duo to Be Honored at Association of Fundraising Professionals’ (AFP) 44th Annual National Philanthropy Day Awards             on Nov. 16, 2016

SAN DIEGO, CA – October 05, 2016 – Homebuilder and developer Brookfield Residential in partnership with HomeAid San Diego has been named the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) San Diego Chapter’s Outstanding Philanthropic Corporation. The duo will be honored at AFP’s 44th Annual National Philanthropy Day awards on Wednesday, Nov. 16, following National Philanthropy Day on Nov. 15.

As this year’s honored philanthropic corporation, Brookfield Residential and HomeAid San Diego teamed up to bring to life two of California’s first memory care homes which will specifically serve adults with developmental and age-related disabilities.

“We’re always looking for ways to give back to the community and we are proud of the work we’re doing to make sure people with developmental disabilities have homes that accommodate their specialized needs,” says Adrian Foley, president and COO of Brookfield Residential California. “Brookfield Residential thanks the AFP for recognizing this project and the fantastic collaboration of HomeAid and fellow builder organizations like CalAtlantic Homes and Murfey Construction that are bringing this project to life.”

The homes were designed in conjunction with The UC San Diego Down Syndrome Center for Research and Treatment to include features that maximize residents’ comfort, including motion sensors and infinity pathways to prevent residents from getting lost or feeling confused. The homes will also offer state-of-the-art technology meeting California’s Title 24 energy efficiency standards, including silent alarms and other medical features hidden from site to ensure the beautifully designed residences feel like homes and not a medical facility.

“We are touched by the support we have received and so thankful for the recognition that this project deserves,” says Alexis Parker, executive director of HomeAid San Diego. “These homes simply could not have been realized without the help of many individuals throughout our community.”

The two 5,000 square-foot homes, located at Noah Homes, a nonprofit supporting adults with developmental disabilities, will serve 20 individuals. Currently, there are an estimated 800 San Diegans in need of this type of care. The two memory care homes, now under construction in Spring Valley, Calif., are scheduled to open in late 2016.

“Age-related illnesses like dementia and Alzheimer’s have only recently affected the population of adults with developmental disabilities,” says Molly Nocon, CEO of Noah Homes and member of the California Health and Human Services Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Advisory Committee. “They say it takes a village and with Brookfield and HomeAid, we have been able to accomplish the impossible as a nonprofit — building two innovative homes for a population in need, without incurring any debt. We are grateful that our local builder community has come together to help build these much-needed residences.”

The two organizations and more than 62 building partners — including CalAtlantic Homes that helped secure materials to build the homes — have generated in excess of $1.5 million in donated professional services, labor and materials as part of the Noah Homes capital campaign.

Brookfield Residential and HomeAid San Diego are being recognized along with honorees in the following categories: outstanding philanthropist, outstanding development professional, outstanding organizational volunteer, outstanding fundraising volunteer, outstanding grant making organization and outstanding youth/student volunteer.

For more information about the Noah Homes Memory Care project or to support the Memory Care fundraiser, please visit www.noahhomes.org/memorycare.

About HomeAid San Diego
HomeAid San Diego, one of 17 chapters of HomeAid America, Inc., was founded in March 2002 with the support of local building and real estate industry organizations. HomeAid San Diego partners with the building industry and San Diego nonprofits who serve at-risk populations, to build multi-unit housing for families and individuals. Through the generosity of the building industry, their trade partners and suppliers, these projects are built at a reduced cost of construction, preserving the nonprofit’s donor funds to expand their capacity to serve. Please visit www.homeaidsd.org for more information.

About Brookfield Residential (Southern California)
Brookfield Residential Southern California (Los Angeles and San Diego), a division of Brookfield Residential, is committed to being more than a homebuilder. We strive to create the best places to call home. The Brookfield Residential Southern California (Los Angeles and San Diego) team has the passion, the expertise and the local knowledge to craft homes and neighborhoods that speak to homebuyers at every stage of life. We are an award-winning homebuilder and industry leader with an exceptional reputation for quality, design, and customer service. Please visit www.BrookfieldSoCal.com for more information.

Brookfield Residential Properties Inc. is a leading land developer and homebuilder in North America. We entitle and develop land to create master-planned communities, sell lots to third-party builders, and operate our own home building division. We also participate in select, strategic real estate opportunities, including infill projects, mixed-use developments, and joint ventures. Further information is available at BrookfieldResidential.com.

Professional Builder: Brookfield Residential Partners With HomeAid San Diego On Memory-Care Homes

Brookfield Residential of Costa Mesa, Calif., and HomeAid San Diego  have teamed up to build two of the first memory-care homes in California, designed specifically to serve adults with developmental and age-related disabilities. The homes are located on the site of Noah Homes, a nonprofit supporting adults with developmental disabilities, in Spring Valley (east San Diego).

The Brookfield/HomeAid partnership was named the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) San Diego Chapter’s 2016 Outstanding Philanthropic Corporation. The two organizations and more than 62 building partners have generated in excess of $1.5 million in donated professional services, labor and materials as part of the Noah Homes capital campaign.

The two 5,000-square-foot homes were designed by Dahlin Group Architecture/Planning of Pleasanton, Calif., in conjunction with the UC San Diego Down Syndrome Center for Research and Treatment. Each home will accommodate 10 individuals and include features that will maximize resident comfort, including motion sensors and infinity pathways that do not terminate in a 90-degree directional change, allowing a safe path of travel. They will also offer state-of-the-art technology meeting California’s Title 24 energy-efficiency standards, including silent alarms and other medical features hidden from sight to ensure that the residences feel like homes rather than medical facilities.

At press time, both homes were under construction and are scheduled to open in late 2016.

For additional perspective, DI reached out to Adrian Foley, president and COO of Brookfield Residential California; Colin Koch, operations coordinator for Brookfield Residential Southern California; Alexis Parker, executive director of HomeAid San Diego; and Molly Nocon, CEO of Noah Homes.

[DI]

What makes this project meaningful for you as housing providers and for the community as a whole?

[NOCON]

Age-related illnesses like dementia and Alzheimer’s have only recently affected the population of adults with development disabilities. Currently there are an estimated 800 San Diegans in need of this type of care. They say it takes a village, and with Brookfield and HomeAid, we have been able to accomplish the impossible as a nonprofit: building two innovative homes for a population in need, without incurring any debt.

[FOLEY]

We’re always looking for ways to give back to the community and we are proud of the work we’re doing to make sure people with developmental disabilities have homes that accommodate their special needs. This effort is helping phenomenal individuals to get the daily care they need to live full lives.

[PARKER]

Our leading effort is to bring together building professionals with social-service agencies to build needed facilities at a significantly reduced cost. The power of this collaborative building model has come alive on the Noah Homes campus, and we couldn’t be more proud of the project and people behind it.

[DI]

Can you give me a few examples of the features that are compliant with Title 24?

[FOLEY]

The homes have high-efficiency LED fixtures inside and out; R-19 walls and R-30 roof/attic insulation and radiant barriers; solar energy; low U-factor, double-tinted Milgard windows and insulated exterior doors; high-efficiency tankless water heaters; SolaTube natural lighting; Energy Star appliances; LPG-fueled appliances; and a split HVAC system with a two-stage compressor, variable-speed motor, and Infinity Controller.

The project also features drought-tolerant landscaping with low-voltage lighting and a low-flow, drip irrigation system with self-sufficient well water that will not impact county water usage. Four efficient and elaborate bio-retention water basins, or swales, are integrated into the landscape design to capture and filter rainwater runoff.

[DI]

How are the homes designed to give residents a sense of autonomy and safety?

[KOCH]

There are single- and double-occupancy rooms with dedicated bathrooms, where each individual has a personal desk space, closet, room fan, independent lighting, and other amenities. Outside of each room entry is a memory box, a built-in glass cabinet where residents can store personal memoirs and items of significance.

All common areas are extremely spacious with high ceilings and ample seating. NanaWall glass doors opening to California Rooms provide the opportunity for residents to experience indoor/outdoor living. One of the homes has a second NanaWall system that opens to a trellised patio area.

Interfaith Community Services: Hawthorne Veterans and Family Resource Center and Haven House Year-Round Shelter

Interfaith Community Services rounds out a stellar 2015 with the opening of Hawthorne Veteran and Family Resource Center and Haven House in Escondido, California. The two projects mark the third and fourth build collaborations, respectively, with HomeAid San Diego.  

Interfaith hosted their Grand Opening ceremony on October 7, 2015 to celebrate the completion of the Hawthorne Veteran and Family Resource Center (Resource Center), a $3.2 million full-scale renovation project in partnership with HomeAid San Diego.

The new Resource Center will be home to Interfaith’s existing Recuperative Care Program, reserving 20 beds for homeless veterans, and 12 new beds for homeless non-veterans, exiting North County hospitals following their hospitalization. Individuals admitted to the Recuperative Care Program will receive post-hospitalization care and support in a safe and sterile environment for up to 90 days, opposed to returning to the streets where they face an increased risk of injury or illness.

Interfaith Community Services is one of only five programs in the United States that provides essential care to veterans exiting the hospital and the only agency in the state of California certified by the Department of Veterans Affairs to administer recuperative care to veterans.

The 10,000 square feet center was once a medical office building that had been abandoned for 20 years. HomeAid San Diego took the lead in providing Interfaith with professional project management and construction oversight from the ground breaking in February 2015 to its completion at the end of September 2015.

The Resource Center features two levels with lounge and recreation space for clients. The facility is also equipped with elevator access, an emergency food pantry, a laundry room and an employment services computer lab.

In total, HomeAid San Diego garnered over $600,000 towards construction costs through relationships with Johnson & Jennings General Contracting, who lead the construction, and Ware Malcomb Architects, who lead on design of the facility.

Additional project partners and supporters include: Ickler Electric Corporation, Industrial Commercial Systems, Insight Structural Engineers, Hunsaker & Associates, Valley Crest Landscape Design, MZ Demolition, Hawthorne Brothers Toolshed Equipment, Behr Pain, General Electric and Howard’s Rugs.

Haven House

Haven House is the latest renovation project between Interfaith and HomeAid San Diego, which opened its doors to the public on December 23, 2015. The facility is the first permanent, year-round shelter for men and women in North County San Diego.

Formerly known as Haven House “Emergency Winter Shelter”, the facility will now be known as Haven House “Year-Round Shelter”.

HomeAid San Diego has helped Interfaith to renovate the existing space to accommodate up to 49 men and women on any given night. Not only will Haven House provide those in need with traditional offerings: a bed, meals and a place to shower and launder clothing, but clients will be able to receive case management services and support if they so choose. Interfaith hopes to retain those seeking assistance for the night, by introducing to them to their programs and services aimed at helping them to develop long-term solutions to lift them out of homelessness.